6 Comments

  1. Linda

    We found a bottle like this buried in our old shed. Does anyone know how old it is?

    Reply
    • Tom Licence

      These bottles from Chivers date from the 1910s. By the 1920s they were made in an automatic bottling machine, and so the mould seam of later bottles runs all the way up the side and through the lip, to the top of the bottle.

      Reply
      • Roger Dinnis

        Have just uncovered one of these bottles in Rode, Somerset. (May 2018). It was with many other broken bottles used as fill around a clay drain. This land was owned by the local brewery and we have found many broken bottles but also two complete ones which are now in Frome Museum, I have also found two glass balls used as stoppers in that type of bottle.

        Reply
        • Tom Licence

          Hello Roger, thanks for sending this information. It’s useful for plotting the spread of packaged products around the country. When we dug a site in Diss, Norfolk, in 2015, we also found glass and ceramic waste used as packing around a drain – or at least tipped on top of it in the hole. In this context it may have had a soak-away function. We have excavated a few soak-aways of this sort in flower beds, which were meant to assist drainage. Tom.

          Reply
  2. Anita Lloyd

    we were exploring a nearby river and found 3 bottles, one of which had the similarities of this bottle. The river is located in Herefordshire. we were wondering if you had any more info about how and when it got here.

    Reply
    • Tom Licence

      Hello Anita, thanks for getting in touch. People have always thrown empty bottles into rivers. It may have been discarded by someone having a picnic. Beer bottles were often thrown in rivers when men came home from the pub. Sometimes, however, rivers were used for large-scale refuse dumping, which sometimes occurred along their banks to fill in old clay pits or help build up flood defences. Backwaters could become sites of unofficial tipping. In the age before regular rural waste collection (often not until the 1950s), people in the countryside had to get rid of their rubbish however they could. Tom.

      Reply

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